Transform your company culture

company culture

I am not just doing the regular marketing for my clients. I want to be able to accomplish more. I want to work with the best, and I want to be able to help them achieve a whole new level of customer service through transforming their business culture. To me, this is all part of marketing.

If the company culture is fantastic, the products will be fantastic, and the customer experience will be fantastic, and in the end, everything related to the business will be brilliant. It’s not as easy as it may sound, but what you need to understand, is that marketing is not just about products.

We need to start by taking a deep dive down inside the company, to see how the culture can help us achieve on a completely different level. It’s always about people, but it shouldn’t be about each individual. Just take a look at Zappos and what they’ve accomplished. Amazing things will happen, if we can make people the most important part of the business culture. We should always focus on people, and find ways to make people even more important as part of the company, than working alone, in an office, with the door shut.

There are many ways to get the people in the company to understand the values of the company, and to make them feel that they belong and are part of the company culture, and that they’re not just an individual doing his job.

Here are a few examples of ways you can transform your company culture.

5 Ways To Transform Your Company Culture

First, before you start doing all the things I am suggesting, you need to define success. What is your company culture, what are your values? The people in the company should know, they should understand what it’s all about, and why it’s so important, and I believe that the customers should know as well. The more people that knows about your culture and the values, the better the company will perform.

1. Create fun and events

I am creating my small healthy habits this year. And, that’s something every company should implement as well. Start by creating something fun every week, it could be a small event that will make people happy. For instance, you might want to do something on Friday, before the weekend. Buy a Cake, play a game, or have a quiz and give a prize to the winner. It doesn’t have to be much. Just make sure you do it. Start small, and turn it into a habit.

2. In-person education

New employees should be bonding with their more experienced co-workers as soon as possible. They should be added to education, field trips, and activities together. But, more important, is that we schedule a way to educate each other at work. What usually happens is that, if we need more education, we’re going away on a seminar or we attend courses somewhere else. I believe it’s more important to talk with each other, and find out what you can do at work when it comes to education. Cooperate. Help people help people. Help people share their knowledge with their co-workers.

3. Do activities together

Work shouldn’t always be about work. We should focus on doing things that we normally won’t do at work. And I love the thought of playing video-games, and do various events at work. But, no matter what type of activities we add, the focus should be that we are doing them together. That’s how we build a culture. In some businesses, it’s easy to see who are on the same team, who are working together on a regular basis, and who are just saying hi once in a while. If you do things together, across the company, it’s a lot easier to get people to open up, and to understand what they are a part of.

4. New employee roles

I am not a huge fan of role playing in real life, although I really enjoy role playing games on my computer. But, I am a fan of new employee roles, as a way to get people to think outside the box. Let me give you an example. If you are working at a car dealer, and you are a mechanic, your job is to look at cars, and fix cars most of the day. What if they added a new role to your job, and this month, you were the head of teaching Spanish. You need to teach every employee facts about Spain, and you need to teach everyone at work one new word every day, for a whole month. Wouldn’t that be something. I know, you don’t understand a word Spanish, and you’ve never been to Spain, and you won’t ever need to talk Spanish at work – but, adding new employee roles like this, will help people understand how important it is to talk to other people at work, and it will help co-workers become friends.

5. Create benefits

We all love benefits, and it’s not always about the money. We want to accomplish our goals, and we want positive feedback. As part of your company culture, create a system of benefits, that will make people realize what is important and why it’s important. You should create a system with points and scorecards, and make employees give each other points. It could be points from 1 to 10 each week, and the points should be related to who did the best job with a customer, and who did the best job with a co-worker, or whatever. The important part is that the points are related to what you want to achieve (your definition of success).

Create a shop, where your employees can buy products for the points. It could be as easy as adding a shelf somewhere they can see it, and add an iPad Mini, a pair of shoes, tickets to the movie theatre, a bottle of Coca-Cola Zero, and more, and you add stickers with how many points they need in order to buy the products. This shelf of products will be something the employees will look at on a daily basis, and it will make them think about the company culture.

What’s your experience with company culture?

I would really enjoy a discussion about company culture. What’s your thoughts about the things I have suggested? Do you have any more suggestions?

Let’s discuss it.

  • http://www.wonderoftech.com Carolyn

    Hi Jens, Company culture is very important and goes a long way towards employee satisfaction. Companies too often ignore this or cut back on the little things that make employees happy.

    Last summer we had a cookout for the employees of my husband’s department, complete with spouses. People were so grateful to use for the party because there hadn’t been a get-together with spouses for years so people hadn’t been seeing each other. The cookout was very inexpensive but made a world of difference to people.

    I like your idea of contests too. Everyone likes to win something! I used to work for a consumer products company and we could get a free product every month. That was great to try out new products.

    You’re giving your clients great advice, Jens!

  • http://slymarketing.com Jens-Petter Berget

    Hi Carolyn,

    That cookout sounds awesome. We did have a few of those at the University as well, and it always made a world of difference to people. It’s inexpensive, and many times, this is a lot more important than regular meetings. I’m not saying that I am going to organize cookouts, but I want to let my clients know how important they are as part of marketing :)

  • http://b2bmarketingexperiences.com Tom De Baere (

    Jens, I have learned that a company culture (I call it a company DNA) is something which was created from the start of the company, and from then onward is part of the DNA of the company.

    It’s people hiring other people that have the same DNA. And it’s very hard to change that with superfluous and temporary things. It’s really hard to change a company culture.

    You can see the clashes when companies merge. And the end-results will never be a perfect merger. What you see often with mergers is that they slash the upper management exactly for that reason.

    But what you CAN do is focus on the good things which are already inside the company, and enlarge those.

    The points you mention are also about employee motivation. And that’s absolutely something which is important. I call that internal branding: who do we want to be internally? Through the social events you organise you define who you are. Is it going to be bowling or bungee jumping ;-)

    Thanks for this post. I hope this adds.

    Tom De Baere

  • http://slymarketing.com Jens-Petter Berget

    That’s great advice Tom. This is a great analogy. And I’ll use that for the project I’m currently working on. I am working with a company right now, and I’ll be interviewing all the employees about motivation, values and the culture. I am looking forward to see what I come up with :)

  • http://www.trickmillion.com Mohd Aktar

    hey mate,
    Company culture is very important and goes a long way towards employee satisfaction. Companies too often ignore this or cut back on the little things that make employees happy.
    yhanks nd keep it up

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